CANADA


Why Study in Canada?

Canada has consistently maintained its prestige as an attractive education hub due to a variety of factors including its global recognition and reputation, affordability, cultural exposure and abundant research opportunities. Canada has established itself as an immensely high benchmark for academic standards and has rigorous processes to uphold quality that ultimately are designed to broaden opportunities for the longer term.

For a country that measures high amongst the OECD countries in terms of its overall quality of life, its tuition and living costs are surprisingly lower than one may speculate, especially when compared with other supreme education hubs such as the USA and UK. Furthermore, a total of 13 universities from Canada are recognized in the world’s top 200 by QS including 3 that appear in the Top 50.  

Universities in Canada

U15, the Group of 15 Canadian Universities is central to fostering intellectual, social, economic and cultural innovation and advancement of Canada’s international influence and effectiveness. The U15 are absolutely unmatched in their delivery of quality education as is evidenced in their $5.3 Billion research income with 87% private-sector research of Canada carried out by the group. Furthermore, the group holds ownership to 81% technology licenses as patents and intellectual property that are key to attracting global investment for business operations internationally. However, Canada like all other supreme education deliverers has a diverse subject pool to choose from and hence a range of other institutions outside of U15 also have specializations that are highly appealing.

Canadian universities and colleges have a comparative advantage in the following study areas: Aerospace, Animation, Medicine, Engineering (Specialised in Automotive, Civil, Mining and Petroleum), Energy, Telecommunications, Agriculture, IT, Environmental Sciences, Biotechnology, Business as well as Finance and Economics, International Business and Affairs as well as Physical Sciences.

Skill Shortages

One of Canada’s biggest headaches is the fear of not being able to align its huge investment opportunities with a support system of skilled workers. Although Canada has a well-equipped education system that is effective in producing and nurturing talent for its economy, shifting demographics and an ageing population is a concern for the longer-term sustainability of Canada’s economy. Hence, there are an array of opportunities that are open to the international labour market offering possibilities of healthy job security and immigration. Construction as well as mining and petroleum sectors are some of the industries that will face severe skill shortages over the next decade and are hence demanding engineers specialised in mining, petroleum, civil, mechanical, geological, computer and chemical. Furthermore, there is demand for financial and investment analysts, geoscientists and oceanographers, medical laboratory and radiation technologists, physiotherapists, apart from electrophysiological diagnostic technologists.